All you need to know about the house dust mite
For the Curious

Why ventilate your home against house dust mites?

House dust is a complex mixture containing many different foreign proteins, as well as a variety of arthropods [i.e. mites], nematodes [worms], bacteria, fungi and human skin scales. Ventilation, combined with controlled humidity is key to controlling the levels of dust exposure to vulnerable lungs.
'House dust is a complex mixture containing many different foreign proteins, as well as a variety of arthropods [i.e. mites], nematodes [worms], bacteria, fungi and human skin scales'. Ventilation, combined with controlled humidity is key to controlling the levels of dust exposure to vulnerable lungs.These were the words expressed by Dr TAE Platts-Mills, Asthma and Allergic Disease Center, University of Virginia, USA

Following birth the average human lung continues to grow until the age of 18, stops growing for about 10 years, then declines naturally. The air we breathe combined with lifestyle and our genetic makeup impacts upon all three stages of lung development. Furthermore, research has shown that slow passive breathing drives particles deeper into lungs than increased breathing rates. Taken together, passive breathing in a poorly ventilated room combined with excessive dust exposure and humidity over 50% relative humidity, is not good for lungs. Scientists have noted immune reactions against house dust mite allergens deep in the delicate gas exchange area of the lung.

Recirculation of fouled air in an enclosed space can exacerbate the problem.


References

The 9th Symposium on Specific Allergy 2012, 27-29 September, Berlin, Germany www.alk abello.com/research/congresses/sosa/Documents/Abstracts%20only.pdf

'Nitric oxide production by alveolar macrophages in response to house dust mite faecal pellets and the mite allergens, Der p 1 and Der p2.' Peake et al. J. Aller. Clin. Immunol.; 2003, 112:531-7

'Mechanisms of particulate matter toxicity', S Salvi, S T Holgate, 'Clin. & Exper. Allergy', 1999, Vol. 29, pp 1187 - 1194